MRO Magazine

EASA convention succeeds with education

The U.S. city that was made famous by the WKRP in Cincinnati television show of the 1970s was the venue for the 2002 convention of the Electrical Apparatus Service Association (EASA) in June. Delegate...


September 1, 2002
By Bill Roebuck, Editor

The U.S. city that was made famous by the WKRP in Cincinnati television show of the 1970s was the venue for the 2002 convention of the Electrical Apparatus Service Association (EASA) in June. Delegates attended from all around the U.S. as well as from Canada, Australia, Chile, England, Singapore, South Africa, Venezuela and several other countries.

EASA’s annual convention is unusual for an industrial venue as it is known as a family event and many delegates bring their spouses and children. Social events are geared to keep everyone active, while seminars, workshops, and plant tours make sure EASA members have plenty to learn.

There was a small decline in attendance this year, both among delegates and the children who often attend the social events. Even so, says Linda Raynes, EASE president and CEO, “there were more than 2,500 attendees with some 442 service centres represented.” The convention was very successful, she said, “despite the economic climate that our entire industry is experiencing.”

Those who did attend found lots to do and learn. A trade show with over 150 exhibitors featured the latest electrical apparatus tools and technologies. Technical sessions covered mechanical repair tips, troubleshooting and repair of servo motors, and highlights of root cause failure analysis. Several business seminars offered sales, operations and management tips.

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The results of a major new motor rewind study were also announced by EASA and the Association of Electrical & Mechanical Trades in the U.K. The study showed that there is no significant loss in efficiency for motors that are rewound following established industry practices. A copy of the results can be downloaded from EASA’s website at www.easa.com.

EASA business activities included the completion of the consolidation of some EASA regions. Outgoing EASA chairman Michael Stewart said the association remains “healthy and strong.” Incoming chairman Woodrow S. McClure, Jr., promised to “continue the traditions of excellence and service that have been established by chairman Stewart and other leaders before him. McClure runs Dixie Electro Mechanical Services, Charlotte, N.C.

McClure’s theme for his term, and for next year’s convention, is “Get ahead of the curve.” The next EASA convention takes place June 29-July 2, 2003, in San Francisco (see www.easa.com).

EASA has over 2,200 electro-mechanical sales and services firms in 59 countries as members. It offers various education and engineering programs to keep members up to date on materials, equipment and technology related to the sale, service and maintenance of motors, generators, drives, controls and other electro-mechanical equipment.