MRO Magazine

GE and Michigan State University celebrate $200,000 renewal of support


February 5, 2016
By Business Wire News

EAST LANSING, Mich.

GE will renew its relationship with Michigan State University and celebrate a $200,000 gift in support of the College of Engineering during ribbon-cutting ceremonies at 10 a.m. on Friday, Feb. 5.

Officials from MSU and GE will dedicate the redesigned third-floor lobby in East Wilson Hall. The event features MSU President Lou Anna K. Simon, MSU Engineering Dean Leo Kempel, and GE officials, who will celebrate the company’s most recent gift to the college’s CoRe Experience. CoRe is MSU’s first-year engineering program that integrates the academic program with a living-learning community that connects students to their engineering future.

The updated lobby offers students a collaborative space that reflects GE’s highly collaborative business as the world’s digital industrial company, said Mike Wagner, general manager, electronics components, controls & accessories value stream, GE Aviation.

For photos and the full story, visit: http://www.egr.msu.edu/news/2016/02/04/ge-and-msu.

“Our goal is to encourage students to use this colorful and upbeat space to fine tune team-building skills, which are essential at our company,” Wagner said.

GE will also host games and networking for students all day Friday. “We’ll bring very cool virtual-reality goggles for students to experience, and we’ll have give-away prizes and activities to show students what GE is like,” Wagner added.

Kempel said the celebration is a day of significance for the college.

“GE’s re-commitment to CoRe is even more meaningful than their original support because it shows they have seen the value of being engaged with CoRe these past three years. It benefits our students to have the strong support of engineering industry employers in the college,” Kempel added.

Headquartered in Fairfield, Conn., GE has offices in 175 countries and employs 305,000 people — 136,000 in the U.S. GE created some of the world’s most important devices — such as the X-ray machine, electronic locomotives, and the electric fan. It works in more than a dozen industries — from aviation and retail to health care and food and beverages. For more, go to: http://www.ge.com/.

About MSU Engineering: The Michigan State University College of Engineering has nine academic programs serving 5,000 undergraduate and more than 600 graduate students. For more, go to: www.egr.msu.edu.

Michigan State University College of Engineering
Patricia Mroczek, 517-432-1303
mroczekp@egr.msu.edu