MRO Magazine

What makes a good tool?

According to Bahco, a good tool should reduce the risk of direct injury. It should:...


February 1, 2004
By MRO Magazine

According to Bahco, a good tool should reduce the risk of direct injury. It should:

– Not have any sharp edges on the handle.

– Minimize wear and tear on the skin.

– Reduce the risk of users hands getting caught in tight spots.

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– Reduce the risk of users hands coming into contact with sharp edges and shoulders.

– Be slip-resistant.

A good tool also should reduce the risk of long-term injury. It should:

– Have the optimal weight for its purpose.

– Have a grip that protects the user from hot and cold temperatures.

– Minimize the build-up of muscular tension during lengthy jobs.

– Have a large gripping surface that exerts low, even pressure across the hand.

– Deliver the greatest possible power with the least possible effort.

– Vibrate as little as possible.

– Be perfectly balanced.

Finally, a good tool should make the user’s job easier. It should:

– Be the correct size and design for its purpose.

– Be able to be used in different positions.

– Not require the user to change grip, if possible.

– Be adjustable in many different positions.

– Be adjustable even when wearing gloves.

– Be designed for use with both hands, if required.

– Be easy to hold, with the right degree of friction against the skin.

– Be available in different sizes, suitable for different tasks.

– Tolerate oil and grease.

Bahco