MRO Magazine

Apprenticeship Training Likely Leads To A Permanent Job

Ottawa, ON -- Nationally, 88% of apprentices who completed their program were employed, compared with 82% of those who did not finish, according to the 2007 National Apprenticeship Survey recently rel...


November 1, 2008
By MRO Magazine

Ottawa, ON — Nationally, 88% of apprentices who completed their program were employed, compared with 82% of those who did not finish, according to the 2007 National Apprenticeship Survey recently released by Statistics Canada. Those who completed were also more likely to have full-time jobs and receive substantially higher wages.

At a provincial and territorial level, apprentices who completed their programs were also more likely to be employed than those who did not finish. This difference was more pronounced in Ontario, where 91% of completers were employed compared with 82% of discontinuers. In contrast, the difference was least pronounced in Quebec, where 72% of completers and 70% of discontinuers were employed.

Across Canada, among those who were employed, people who finished their training were more likely to have permanent jobs (80% of completers compared with 76% of discontinuers). This was true in all provinces and territories except Alberta, where an equal proportion (77%) of completers and discontinuers who worked held permanent employment.

Those who completed their programs earned more per hour than those who discontinued their programs. Nationally, the median hourly wage of completers was $27 compared with $20 for discontinuers. Across provinces and territories, the difference in the median hourly wage between completers and discontinuers was highest in the Atlantic provinces and in Alberta, while it was lowest in the territories and in Saskatchewan.

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More than one-third (36%) of long-term continuers as of 2004 had completed their apprenticeship program by 2007, while 56% were still pursuing their program. Only 8% had discontinued their apprenticeship training.

However, almost two-thirds (64%) of those who had discontinued an apprenticeship program as of 2004 had returned to their apprenticeship program by 2007 and had either completed their apprenticeship program (26%), or were still enrolled in one (38%). Just over one-third of discontinuers as of 2004 were still discontinuers three years later.

Women were more likely to come back and complete their program than men. About 38% of women who had dropped out in 2004 had finished their program by 2007, compared with only 24% of their male counterparts.

There was not one major factor but rather a multitude of factors that explained why discontinuers left their apprenticeship program. The reason most often cited by discontinuers (16%) for not completing their program was that there was not enough work in the trade to warrant continuing or insufficient income as an apprentice to meet their requirements.

About 10% of discontinuers stopped their program because they had received a better job offer. An additional 8% of discontinuers stopped because they disliked the work or the working conditions.

A further 8% of apprentices discontinued their program because they wanted to change jobs or careers, became self-employed or lost interest. An additional 4% discontinued their studies as a result of employer, company, or union issues, including problems such as the employer discontinuing the apprenticeship program or not following the rules.

As well, three in 10 discontinuers (30%) reported a diverse range of other reasons for not completing their apprenticeship program.


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