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Apprenticeship community to address skills shortages at June conference

Ottawa - Shortages in the skilled trades are already having an impact on Canadian employers, creating an early warning for the demographic crunch expected in the next decade. Construction, mining, energy, manufacturing and service sectors all...


Ottawa – Shortages in the skilled trades are already having an impact on Canadian employers, creating an early warning for the demographic crunch expected in the next decade. Construction, mining, energy, manufacturing and service sectors all report real and anticipated shortages that will pose a pan-Canadian challenge to the country’s economy.

In preparation for its June 2012 conference, the Canadian Apprenticeship Forum has released a program focused on Apprenticeship: Strategies for Success. Showcasing the best in apprenticeship training and practices in Canada, the conference is a breeding ground for new ideas, solutions and partnerships. The event will serve as a meeting place for apprenticeship stakeholders concerned about labour shortages among the people who keep Canada and its infrastructure working.

Addressing the challenge requires both awareness and commitment from stakeholders across Canada, including business, labour, educators and various levels of government. Apprenticeship contributes to solving skills shortages and provides opportunities for knowledge transfer from one generation to the next, while also engaging young people at a time when youth unemployment rates remain high.

The CAF-FCA 2012 Conference is a biennial event that is held in various locations across Canada. This year, the event will be held from June 3-5 in Regina, SK. Presentations will focus on innovation, diversity and engagement.

The conference website is at www.caf-fca.org/conference.


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1 Comment » for Apprenticeship community to address skills shortages at June conference
  1. nigel Doran says:

    Despite the hype about skilled trade shortages from government bodies and employers people who want to pursue an apprenticeship are still unable to find employers willing to hire them. My own daughter wanted to be a Class 310T truck mechanic: pursued OYAP and Enhanced OYAP during high school and a College course where she completed the first two years of the provincial licencing exams. After 4 years of looking for an company to hire her she is resigned to working at an auto parts manufacturer making car parts.

    Her story is the norm, I know people who wanted to be industrial electricians, millwrights, toolmakers etc. and their experiences are the same. Shure some people are successful and find an apprenticeship I would suggest most don’t.

    Is there a shortage of skilled trades? I would say no.

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