MRO Magazine

Team collaboration fails because of communications, says study

Toronto, ON - The findings of a new study show that, while the majority of organizations value high-impact team collaboration, less than one out of three organizations actually provide framework for it. As a result, the skill gap widens while...


Human Resources

November 10, 2011
By MRO Magazine

Toronto, ON – The findings of a new study show that, while the majority of organizations value high-impact team collaboration, less than one out of three organizations actually provide framework for it. As a result, the skill gap widens while business performance suffers.

The study was completed by ESI International, a project management learning company, which conducted it to determine how successful organizations are in eliminating barriers to team collaboration, such as hierarchies, silos and the wrong combination of training.

Almost 81% of respondents suggested that communications lies at the heart of cross-team collaboration failure.

The study’s major findings determined that:

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– the majority of organizations, in fact, do not work collaboratively, despite the value that they realize would come from better teamwork.

– rigid work structures exist within companies that keep people from working together.

– organizations are not investing in the right mix of skills training needed to improve collaboration on projects and initiatives.

While 65.5% of respondents believe that their organization’s project performance would improve if their teams worked more collaboratively, only 27.8% actually do.

ESI says the study validates the increasing need for business skills such as leadership and critical thinking amongst organizations today. Further, the study suggests best practices for building collaborative teams, such as more authority within projects, tearing down organizational roadblocks and providing the right mix of business and technical skills. These efforts can lead to more collaboration, better project/initiative outcomes and, ultimately, higher overall business impact, according to ESI.

For more information, visit http://www.esi-intl.com.