MRO Magazine

News

April 28 is a Day For Remembering lives lost or injured in the workplace

Hamilton, ON -- In 2006, almost a thousand workers in Canada lost their lives to a disease or injury they incurred ...


Hamilton, ON — In 2006, almost a thousand workers in Canada lost their lives to a disease or injury they incurred from work-related causes. A total of 976 workplace deaths were recorded, and another 900,000 workers were injured or became ill.

To honour those workers across the country whose lives have been lost, who have been injured or disabled on the job, or suffer from occupational diseases, April 28th has been set aside as the National Day of Mourning. The Day of Mourning is an opportunity not only to remember, but also for employees and employers to publicly renew their commitment to improve health and safety in the workplace.

This day of observance was established when the Workers Mourning Day Act was passed in December 1990. Since that time, various events are organized each year by labour organizations across the country to express remembrance for the family, friends and colleagues who have suffered in carrying out workplace duties. The Canadian flag on Parliament Hill will fly at half-mast. Workers will light candles, don ribbons and black armbands, and observe moments of silence.

The Canadian Centre for Occupational Health & Safety (CCOHS) says it hopes that the annual observance of this day will strengthen the resolve of industry in Canada to establish safe conditions in the workplace for all. “It is as much a call to protect the living, as it is a day to remember the dead,” says a CCOHS spokesman.

The CCOHS website has more information about the National Day of Mourning at www.ccohs.ca/events/mourning/.