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New guide helps employers with military leave policy

Ottawa, ON -- Following the terrorist attacks on New York and Washington on September 11th, 2001 companies from acr...


Ottawa, ON — Following the terrorist attacks on New York and Washington on September 11th, 2001 companies from across Canada, many of them divisions of U.S. parent organizations, started thinking seriously about setting up military leave policies.

Employers in the U.S. tend to be more aware of the benefits that military reservists bring to the civilian workplace than their Canadian counterparts. In part this is because U.S. legislation mandates civilian job protection for serving reservists, but also because reservists make up a large percentage of the U.S. military structure, and have been frequently called up to serve.

Proportionally, Canada has fewer reservists and there has not been a legislated call-up of reservists here since before the Second World War.

After 9-11, many realized that if terrorist activity escalated in North America, Canada’s Reserve Force might be called up to serve, and they wanted to be ready. Although employer support programs have been active in Canada for years, many civilian organizations still have no first-hand knowledge of what reservists do, or more importantly, what competitive benefits they bring to the civilian workplace.

In response to this need, the Canadian Forces Liaison Council (CFLC) has published a Military Leave Policy guide. Its easy, step-by-step format is designed specifically to help organizations establish formal military leave policy.

For information on Reserve Force training or employer support programs call the Canadian Forces Liaison Council toll-free at 1-800-567-9908 or visit www.cflc.forces.gc.ca.