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Torque tips to control fasteners

Simple math solves gas/oil mixture dilemmaProblem: I usually have four different gas/oil mix containers to use in various applications, including 50:1, 32:1, 16:1 and unmixed gas. One day I needed som...


Simple math solves gas/oil mixture dilemma

Problem: I usually have four different gas/oil mix containers to use in various applications, including 50:1, 32:1, 16:1 and unmixed gas. One day I needed some 32:1 but only had the 50:1 mix on hand. How do I solve the problem?

Solution: A little basic math solves this problem, and it’s not as formidable as it may seem, if you convert the ratios to rough percentages. To do this, divide the first number of the ratio into 100 (i.e. 50:1=2%, 32:1=3%, 16:1=6%, and so on. The solution here is to pour some of the 2% (50:1) mixture you have on hand into a 1-litre container, and add 10 ml of oil (10 ml = 1% of 1,000 ml or 1 litre), then top up the container with more 2%. That brings the total percentage of the mixture to 3%, which gives you the 32:1 ratio you need.

Also, to avoid confusion with the containers, cut tags about 2-in. x 1-in. out of an aluminum pop can. Write the different mixes on the tags using a ball point pen to emboss them, then fasten them to the various containers.

Thanks from Mr. O, along with a Mr. O Problem Solver T-shirt, go to Harold (Hemlo Harold) Paulson of Marathon, Ont.

Rule of thumb replaces spec book for weight of steel

Problem: Is there a way to determine the weight of steel plate when you don’t have a steel spec book handy?

Solution: You can figure the weight if you remember that 1/4* steel plate weighs about 10 lb per square foot (it’s actually 10.21 lb/sq ft). So if a square foot of 1/4* plate is 10 lb, 1/8* plate would be 5 lb, 1/16* would be 2.5 lb, 3/16* is 7.5 lb, 1/2* is 20 lb, 3/4* is 30 lb, 1* is 40 lb and so on.

By the way, 30 ga. sheet steel weighs about 1/2 lb per square foot. The weight roughly doubles with each 6 ga. step in size (so 24 ga. = 1 lb, 18 ga. = 2 lb, 12 ga. = 4 lb, 6 ga. = 8 lb).

These are close enough approximations when you need them.

Thanks from Mr. O, along with a Mr. O Problem Solver T-shirt, go to Peter Heavysege of Potto Enterprises in Courtice, Ont.

Belt dressing stops cases from slipping on incline conveyor

Problem: Cases have started sliding back down the rubber belt on an incline conveyor, but there’s no time to stop production.

Solution: The rubber belt has become too smooth to create enough friction to hold the cases. Here’s an idea that will work as a quick temporary fix. Simply spray some belt dressing on the belt to stop the slipping. That will allow you to keep production going until the belt can be replaced

Thanks from Mr. O, along with a Mr. O Problem Solver T-shirt, go to millwright John Schepers of Guelph, Ont.Do you have a solution for a maintenance problem? Send it in and if it’s published, we’ll send you a free Mr. O Problem Solver T-shirt and $35.00. Include your address and telephone number, print complete details, and add an illustration to help explain your tip. Send your ideas to Mr. O, Machinery & Equipment MRO, 1450 Don Mills Rd., Don Mills, Ont. M3B 2X7.