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Dangers of offshoring exposed in new book

To empower companies to bring operations back to the United States, Dave Lippert, the president of Hamilton Caster, and industry veteran Tim Hutzel, spent the past three years co-authoring a book that exposes the dangers and hidden costs of...


To empower companies to bring operations back to the United States, Dave Lippert, the president of Hamilton Caster, and industry veteran Tim Hutzel, spent the past three years co-authoring a book that exposes the dangers and hidden costs of offshoring.

The new book tells the stories of companies that have sent their jobs outside of the US and the negative effects these actions had on the quality of their products and services, employees, supply chain providers, consumers and communities.

It examines the motivation these companies had to offshore their jobs as well as the errors of omission they made by not understanding the true cost of offshoring.

Exposing the true costs of these offshoring initiatives to US organizations, the book supplies concrete processes to guide manufacturers in making offshoring and reshoring decisions

As president of Hamilton Caster for 19 years, Lippert understands the importance of manufacturing in the US. “It allows us to create local jobs, stimulate the country’s economy, hire a more technically advanced workforce, and, most importantly, build the best darn caster in the world,” he said.

“Hutzel and Lippert bring a precision of presentation that one would expect of master practitioners in manufacturing,” said Chuck Proudfit, president of At Work on Purpose and SkillSource Consulting. “I encourage you to read this book not only as a primer on reshoring, but also as a point of inception for your engagement in the movement. How can you encourage decision makers and influencers to rally for reshoring? In essence, how can you make a difference?”

Bringing Jobs Back to the USA: Rebuilding America’s Manufacturing Through Reshoring is available on Amazon.com (ISBN: 978-1-4665-5756-7, 245 pp., Hardback, $37.95).

About the authors:

Dave Lippert grew up in southwestern Ohio in an industrial family that founded a manufacturing business in 1907, making and selling industrial casters, wheels, and carts. Currently, Hamilton Caster is in its fourth generation of family management.

Lippert spent his summers working in the family business and experiencing the sights, sounds and smells of the manufacturing floor. He earned his engineering degree at the US Air Force Academy and after serving six years in the Air Force, returned to Hamilton Caster to work under his dad, then the president.

In 1995 Lippert succeeded his father to become the company’s fifth president, the position he now holds. He led his company to adopt the Toyota production system philosophy by creating the Hamilton Caster management system, a spin-off of what is commonly known as a Lean management system. In 1996, Hamilton Caster was awarded first place among Ohio small businesses for team excellence based on early experiences with Lean.

Tim Hutzel was born into a blue collar family in a very small town in southwestern Ohio in 1945. Hutzel entered the workforce at age 14, doing odd jobs such as washing pots and pans at a neighbourhood restaurant, operating rides at a small amusement park, delivering papers, and performing light factory work. Three years later, Hutzel joined the US Army at age 17 as a volunteer and learned the fine art of field artillery; he spent three years in West Germany helping keep the Russians on the east side of the Berlin Wall.

Fifty-plus years later, Hutzel has accrued experiences that include three university degrees, 21 years employment at GE Aviation, 20 years self-employment helping businesses improve themselves, writing a book on how American companies can survive in the United States, serving as adjunct professor to Miami University’s Schools of Engineering and the Farmer School of Business. And now, he has written this book with his good friend, Dave Lippert.


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1 Comment » for Dangers of offshoring exposed in new book
  1. Walter A Nodelman says:

    When I am shopping and I pick up a product in a store, and I read on the product

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News

Dangers of offshoring exposed in new book

To empower companies to bring operations back to the United States, Dave Lippert, the president of Hamilton Caster, and industry veteran Tim Hutzel, spent the past three years co-authoring a book that exposes the dangers and hidden costs of...


To empower companies to bring operations back to the United States, Dave Lippert, the president of Hamilton Caster, and industry veteran Tim Hutzel, spent the past three years co-authoring a book that exposes the dangers and hidden costs of offshoring.

The new book tells the stories of companies that have sent their jobs outside of the US and the negative effects these actions had on the quality of their products and services, employees, supply chain providers, consumers and communities.

It examines the motivation these companies had to offshore their jobs as well as the errors of omission they made by not understanding the true cost of offshoring.

Exposing the true costs of these offshoring initiatives to US organizations, the book supplies concrete processes to guide manufacturers in making offshoring and reshoring decisions

As president of Hamilton Caster for 19 years, Lippert understands the importance of manufacturing in the US. “It allows us to create local jobs, stimulate the country’s economy, hire a more technically advanced workforce, and, most importantly, build the best darn caster in the world,” he said.

“Hutzel and Lippert bring a precision of presentation that one would expect of master practitioners in manufacturing,” said Chuck Proudfit, president of At Work on Purpose and SkillSource Consulting. “I encourage you to read this book not only as a primer on reshoring, but also as a point of inception for your engagement in the movement. How can you encourage decision makers and influencers to rally for reshoring? In essence, how can you make a difference?”

Bringing Jobs Back to the USA: Rebuilding America’s Manufacturing Through Reshoring is available on Amazon.com (ISBN: 978-1-4665-5756-7, 245 pp., Hardback, $37.95).

About the authors:

Dave Lippert grew up in southwestern Ohio in an industrial family that founded a manufacturing business in 1907, making and selling industrial casters, wheels, and carts. Currently, Hamilton Caster is in its fourth generation of family management.

Lippert spent his summers working in the family business and experiencing the sights, sounds and smells of the manufacturing floor. He earned his engineering degree at the US Air Force Academy and after serving six years in the Air Force, returned to Hamilton Caster to work under his dad, then the president.

In 1995 Lippert succeeded his father to become the company’s fifth president, the position he now holds. He led his company to adopt the Toyota production system philosophy by creating the Hamilton Caster management system, a spin-off of what is commonly known as a Lean management system. In 1996, Hamilton Caster was awarded first place among Ohio small businesses for team excellence based on early experiences with Lean.

Tim Hutzel was born into a blue collar family in a very small town in southwestern Ohio in 1945. Hutzel entered the workforce at age 14, doing odd jobs such as washing pots and pans at a neighbourhood restaurant, operating rides at a small amusement park, delivering papers, and performing light factory work. Three years later, Hutzel joined the US Army at age 17 as a volunteer and learned the fine art of field artillery; he spent three years in West Germany helping keep the Russians on the east side of the Berlin Wall.

Fifty-plus years later, Hutzel has accrued experiences that include three university degrees, 21 years employment at GE Aviation, 20 years self-employment helping businesses improve themselves, writing a book on how American companies can survive in the United States, serving as adjunct professor to Miami University’s Schools of Engineering and the Farmer School of Business. And now, he has written this book with his good friend, Dave Lippert.