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Job vacancies jumped in June

Ottawa - Canadian businesses reported 235,000 job vacancies in June 2014, up 15,000 compared with 12 months earlier. For every job vacancy, there were 5.8 unemployed people, down slightly from 6.2 in June 2013, the result of more job vacancies,...


Ottawa – Canadian businesses reported 235,000 job vacancies in June 2014, up 15,000 compared with 12 months earlier. For every job vacancy, there were 5.8 unemployed people, down slightly from 6.2 in June 2013, the result of more job vacancies, reports Statistics Canada.

In Ontario, there were 7.1 unemployed people for every job vacancy, down from 8.4 in June 2013, as there were more job vacancies in the province.

The ratio in British Columbia declined from 5.1 to 4.3 in the 12 months to June. The ratio declined as a result of fewer people being unemployed in the province, as the number of job vacancies was little changed.

In the remaining provinces, the unemployment-to-job vacancy ratios were little changed compared with June 2013.

Ratio by industrial sector

Analysis of the ratio of unemployed people to job vacancies by industrial sector is limited to those who last worked within the past 12 months, as unemployment data by sector are only available for these individuals.

Among the largest industrial sectors, administrative and support services had the highest number of unemployed people for every vacancy at 7.8 in June, up from 5.0 in June 2013. The increase in the ratio was all the result of fewer job vacancies in this sector.

The unemployment-to-job vacancies ratio in health care and social assistance grew from 1.3 to 1.7 in the 12 months to June. Despite the increase, it remains the lowest ratio of all industrial sectors. The increase in the ratio was the result of both fewer job vacancies and more unemployed people in this sector.

In wholesale trade the ratio was 2.6 in June, down from 4.4 a year earlier, as the number of unemployed people who last worked in this sector declined.

Among the smaller industrial sectors, ‘other services’ (such as repair and maintenance or personal and laundry service) was the only sector with a notable decline. Over the 12-month period, the ratio in this sector fell from 3.3 to 2.3.

There was little change in the ratio among all other industrial sectors.

Job vacancy rates

Data from this survey are also used to calculate the job vacancy rate. It is defined as the number of vacant positions divided by total labour demand, that is, occupied positions plus vacant positions. It corresponds to the share of jobs that are unfilled out of all payroll jobs available. Higher job vacancy rates are often associated with periods of economic growth, while lower rates may be associated with periods of slower growth or economic contraction.

In June, the national job vacancy rate among Canadian businesses was 1.6%, little changed compared with the rate of 1.5% recorded 12 months earlier.

Provincially, only Ontario saw a notable change in its job vacancy rate in the 12 months to June. Over this period, the rate in this province increased from 1.2% to 1.4%.

Job vacancy rates by sector

Compared with 12 months earlier, the job vacancy rate fell in two industrial sectors, grew in three and was little changed in the others.

Health care and social assistance had a rate of 1.6% in June, down from 1.8% a year earlier. The sector had 28,000 vacancies in June.

The job vacancy rate in administrative and support services declined from 1.7% to 1.0% in the 12 months to June, with 7,900 job vacancies in June 2014.

In accommodation and food services, the job vacancy rate grew from 2.3% to 3.0% over the 12-month period, and the sector had 37,000 job vacancies in June. The rate also grew in finance and insurance as well as in regional and Aboriginal public administration.