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Skills shortages to be addressed by new federal government approach

Ottawa, ON - The federal government is taking action to address skills shortages so Canadians can train for jobs in a changing economy. Currently Canada's economic recovery is threatened by a lack of information among employers and workers for...


Ottawa, ON – The federal government is taking action to address skills shortages so Canadians can train for jobs in a changing economy. Currently Canada’s economic recovery is threatened by a lack of information among employers and workers for the skills needed in the workforce.

As a result, the Canadian government is developing a new, proactive approach to coordinate the information job seekers will need to find the employers who are hiring.

“Better information will help Canadians find jobs and make the right learning and career choices,” said The Honourable Diane Finley, Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada. “Canadians need colleges and universities, business, labour and governments to all work together to ensure that our workforce develops a broad and diverse set of skills to be highly productive and to allow them to adapt to new technologies, innovations and new challenges.”

The Government is launching an approach that will gather critical information and make it available through a new website called Working in Canada (www.workingincanada.gc.ca), so that Canadians have a clearer picture of who in Canada is hiring and the skills that are needed.

Right now, said Finley, there are significant shortages in many key industries including healthcare, IT and skilled trades, but as more industries take part in this new information sharing strategy the list of employers seeking skilled workers will continue to grow.

“Many of our members have told us that skills and training top their list of priorities,” said Perrin Beatty, president and CEO of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce. “Having the right people is critical to their competitiveness and to their very survival. Canada has a skills shortage problem well on its way to becoming a crisis. We don’t want to face a future where employers can’t fill positions because there aren’t enough qualified workers.”

“We welcome any initiative by the government to address skills-related challenges and opportunities,” he said. “Meeting these challenges and improving the competitiveness of our nation is vital for both our businesses and Canadian workers.”

“As Canada’s largest employer, the Retail Council of Canada welcomes this collaborative approach that will respond productively to the labour market needs of our industry” said Anne Kothawala, RCC’s senior vice-president, public affairs. “Our members are already noticing labour shortages in certain parts of the country and this new program would allow for a more responsive system that can help put people and retail jobs together.”

Merit Canada president Terrance Oakey said “Canada’s Open Shop construction industry welcomes [this] announcement … to generate key market intelligence to address skills shortages across a number of sectors, including the construction industry. Merit Canada will work with the federal government to help build a process that meets the needs of the construction industry from coast to coast.”

“We see this as an opportunity to ensure that the needs of small business and their employees are included in decisions regarding skills and labour shortages,” said Dan Kelly, senior vice-president, legislative affairs and communications, with the Canadian Federation of Independent Business (CFIB). “This data can be very helpful in various government initiatives and policies, such as immigration and training. As a survey-intensive organization focused on small business, we look forward to being able to contribute to the government’s new approach to gathering labour market information,” he added.

The Working in Canada website can be found at www.workingincanada.gc.ca.


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1 Comment » for Skills shortages to be addressed by new federal government approach
  1. Ken Bartlett says:

    As a licensed auto , truck and coach tech. for the past 40 years, as a service manager for the past 30 years ( including 15 years self employment with 7 full time techs working for me ) , I feel that the cause of the shortage of skilled tradesmen and tradeswomen is a result of the lack of foresight in our educational system.
    Throughout the 90′ and the last decade, high school students were encouraged to be experts at computer technology and high school shops were closed by the dozen. Now keyboard punchers cannot find jobs that have more than 24 hours to the work week.
    Now here we are wondering where we will find Canadians to fill the trades and are looking abroad for candidates to fill these positions.

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